Thai teacher does online lessons dressed in colourful traditional clothes amid Covid-19 classroom restrictions

Video: https://www.dropbox.com/s/ey6qav5wrblvvtx/VRP7281.mp4?dl=0

A Thai teacher did her online lessons dressed in colourful traditional clothes while wearing folktale character masks.

Footage shows Wanida Sayawong discussing Thai classical literature with her students in front of her laptop in Ang Thong province, Thailand on January 25.

The creative teacher dressed up as Thai folklore characters – complete with their masks – to show them how these mythical creatures look like.

She portrayed the characters from the ‘Tale of Sang Thong’ named ‘Jao Ngo,’ ‘Giant,’ and ‘Rojana,’ which is about a king who had two wives.

Wadina said she likes teaching but she had always been passionate about art performances so she thought about merging her two interests.

She said: ‘I graduated with a degree in classical Thai dance. My mother is the head of a performance art group and my father is the owner of a Thai musical band.’

The teacher added that she had acting experiences from her mother’s plays which gave her the idea of taking out her old props and prepare an entertaining class.

She said: ‘I thought of using my old props again for my students. I think they enjoyed because everybody participated.

‘My first role was as a mistress’ child, which was one of the most nerve-racking roles I have ever been in. My mother had to push me out to act on stage which made me cry.’

Due to Covid-19, schools in Thailand, as well as neighbouring Southeast Asian countries, had shifted to online classes so there will be less contact between the students.

Some of the schools in low-risk provinces have been re-opened following the easing of restrictions, but others continue with a mixture of limited class sizes and online learning.

Thailand has recorded 15,465 Covid-19 cases and 76 deaths as of January 29. A second wave started in mid-December when hundreds of Burmese migrant workers at a seafood market tested positive. Cases have since spread to more than 45 provinces and lead to lockdowns and mass closures of businesses in some regions.